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Digital Operating Workflow for a Digital Curation Project

Digital Isn’t Software, It’s a Mindset

http://99u.com/videos/23495/aaron-dignan-digital-isnt-software-its-a-mindset

 

99 U is a blog that provides articles, books, videos, sponsors conferences and events that serves as a space that provides the “missing curriculum” to “make ideas happen”. It’s an inspiring resource that I subscribe to using Feedly. Awhile ago, I saved a video titled “Digital Isn’t Software, It’s a Mindset”. It’s a talk by Aaron Dignan, the founding partner of the digital strategy firm Undercurrent, a company that advises big brands on strategy for our digital world.

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Sleepily, this morning, I finally realized its time I watched the video and I was really hooked on the message. Taking workflow examples from some cool companies, mission statements from out-of-the box thinkers, and processes from Dignan calls, “Digital Operating System Companies”, he makes the case that to have a viable business or product today it has to be smart. It has to have the capabilities to learn along the way. There needs to be interconnectivity between the product, the device, the community, the platform. Dignan proposes an operating model of nested stages that look something like this:

  1. Purpose: Have a clear purpose of what you want to do. Put values before revenue; incorporate results orientation
  2. Process: Know how you want to do the work that enables meaningful impact on the people and product
  3. People: Are your people going to be makers or thinkers. What are they going to do in relation to the product
  4. Product: Have a minimum viable product. Make them have utility
  5. Platform: What platform will your product live on to grow and allowed to be shared with?

In my mind, I thought why not apply this frame of thinking about digital operating systems  to that of a digital curation project at a library? Thoughts?

Digital Operating Workflow for a Digital Curation Project

Digital Isn’t Software, It’s a Mindset

http://99u.com/videos/23495/aaron-dignan-digital-isnt-software-its-a-mindset

 99 U is a blog that provides articles, books, videos, sponsors conferences and events that serves as a space that provides the “missing curriculum” to “make ideas happen”. It’s an inspiring resource that I subscribe to using Feedly. Awhile ago, I saved a video titled “Digital Isn’t Software, It’s a Mindset”. It’s a talk by Aaron Dignan, the founding partner of the digital strategy firm Undercurrent, a company that advises big brands on strategy for our digital world.

Image

Sleepily, this morning, I finally realized its time I watched the video and I was really hooked on the message. Taking workflow examples, mission statements, and processes from Dignan calls, “Digital Operating System Companies”, he makes the case that to have a viable business or product today it has to be smart. It has to have the capabilities to learn along the way. There needs to be interconnectivity between the product, the device, the community, the platform. Dignan proposes an operating model of nested stages that look something like this:

  1. Purpose: Have a clear purpose of what you want to do. Put values before revenue; incorporate results orientation
  2. Process: Know how you want to do the work that enables meaningful impact on the people and product
  3. People: Are your people going to be makers or thinkers. What are they going to do in relation to the product
  4. Product: Have a minimum viable product. Make them have utility
  5. Platform: What platform will your product live on to grow and allowed to be shared with?

In my mind, I thought why not apply this frame of thinking about digital operating systems  to that of a digital curation project at a library?

On Becoming a Professional in Digital Curation

Going for my most professional look here

Going for my most professional look here.

 
I hope maybe some of you are in the same boat: you know, the one with folks that do not have exactly want they want to do after library school. You’d think that that was an undergrad problem but for me, it’s quite the reality. Thankfully library science literature is rife with assessments about current library job postings and descriptions.Totally serious, people love writing about library jobs and for that I am so thankful. Being in this digital curation class, i was curious what some digital curation job posting looked liked and low and behold I found this:
 
 
See, easy.
 
In the study, Jeonhyun Kim, Edward Maga, and William E Moem, take a look at 173 job advertisements relating to digital curation posted between October 2011 and April 2012. They analyzed position titles, institution types, background, experience, skills, and duties and were able to develop a set of set of competencies for job developers and job seekers in the field. Here they are (with my commentary):
 
1. Communication and interpersonal compentency: you have to know how to communicate to all creators and users involved in data’s lifecycle.
 
2. Curating and preserving content competency: basically know your DCC lifecycle model!
 
3. Curation technologies competency: knowing is one thing, doing is another- can you use the tools and technology involved in digital curation?
 
4. Environmental scanning competency: In the fast paced digital world are you keeping up with all the changes and staying current with cutting edge trends in digital curation?
 
5. Management, planning, and evaluation competency: digital curation involves teams of individuals working within an institution- do you have skills in planning, coordinating, implementing, and assessing projects? (I found this to be usually true but check out this blog on being an independent information professional http://hacklibschool.wordpress.com/2014/03/24/hacking-your-career-plans-independent-information-professionals/)
 
6. Services Competency: this is an important one- do you have the skills to extend and build digital curation services for your community?
 
7. Systems, models, and modeling cometency: this one is so over me I’m going to quote its description here: “required for high-level, abstract thinking and critical analysis of complex systems, workflows and conceptual models related to digital curation” (whoa.)
 
I think this a great guideline for developing your skills for a job in digital curation. Here are some other fun facts I found interesting about digital curation jobs:
 
– About 75% required having an MLIS
– the average preferred years of experience for a position is 2.7 years
– The most frequently listed knowledge, skill, or ability is working in an information technology intensive environment
– The state of Massachusetts listed the most amount of digital curation jobs
 

Can you see how these competencies line up with the curriculum for our program’s new digital curation career track. Check out the SLIS webpage on the digital curation track here:

http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/programs/post-masters-certificate/career-pathways/digital-curation

I Got Skillz.

Can I succeed in an online environment? The skills I need/have and my reflections on them:

Time Management

SJSU SLIS does not understate how important time-management is for being an online student. Well they are right. What I realized right away is that you need a system in place for balancing your work, school, and personal lives so that you don’t stress yourself out. Often times you have to play around with different things to see what works the best with your schedule. I work a full-time job  and thought I can just work on school after work.  Well sometimes I am tired or itching to go the gym. So I decide to every other day after work to work on school and every other day to take care of other things. What is important is that you commit yourself to finding the scheduling in the time for school.

Organization

Right away I noticed that organization is key! With countless files, usernames, passwords, webpages, assignments, deadlines etc. that you have keep track of, you have some sort of organizational system in place. The content in the Personal Skills module and the course as a whole has been excellent in providing tips for a more organized online learning space. Desktop folders and folders, brilliant. Will definitely do. Diigo, the online bookmark host, so useful! I’ve been trying different things and I am constantly organizing and re-organizing to make sure I am working the most efficiently as I can.

Familiarity with Technology/Ability to learn new technology

Being comfortable using a computer is an absolute must and I can handle that. I’m confident to say I can communicate effectively using email, discussion boards, and chat boards. The webpage on netiquette was a useful refresher on communicating with others online.

In general I am comfortable using a computer and learning new software and programs that enable me to learn and do more in a virtual/online learning environment.

Working with Teams

This past month at work, I was put on an Access Services Cross-Training Committee. This is first time I’ve ever done something collaboratively at my workplace so the information provided by Dr. Ken Haycock could not have come to me at a better time. Although Dr. Haycock specifically points out the differences between committees and teams (you are put on a committee, a committee advises not produces; a team chooses leader, a team is self-managing and has authority to produce something), I have found that learning about the stages of team development, common behaviors and dysfunctions of of bad teams to be quite useful when figuring out my place within the committee. I used to be the quite one but when I learned that being quiet diminishes a common spirit and is conducive to low productivity and motivation, I knew I had to speak up and develop in myself a sense of worth within the committee.

Wonderful things in ordinary places

I wanted to blog about good things. Things I would be excited to write about and smile while I do it. Here’s one wonderful thing in an ordinary place:

I filled up my 1 litre SIGG water bottle today from a water fountain at work. After after topping it off  I took a sip. I’m not even kidding,  I was amazed by how good this water tasted, how fast I was able to access it, and here’s the best part, how cold it was! I then thought, wow, how I wish everyone in the world can have access to water like this for free.

The ordinary place this happened at is at my work, a library.

No joke, check out the condensation:

 

Until next time, I’m constantly on the lookout.

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